10 sec intervals -1 hr observing the sky above my studio, France - evening/late summer
10 sec intervals -1 hr observing the sky above my studio, France - evening/late summer

archive print on Hahnemuhle paper - image 44 x 125cm - edition of 3

8 sec intervals -2 hrs observing the sky above my studio, France - evening/midsummer
8 sec intervals -2 hrs observing the sky above my studio, France - evening/midsummer

archive print on Hahnemuhle paper - image 73 x 100cm - edition of 3

7 sec intervals - observing the landscape flying around Old Sarum, England - afternoon/early autumn
7 sec intervals - observing the landscape flying around Old Sarum, England - afternoon/early autumn

archive print on Hahnemuhle paper - image 94 x 159cm - edition of 3

10 sec intervals -1 hr observing the sky above my studio, France - evening/late summer
10 sec intervals -1 hr observing the sky above my studio, France - evening/late summer

archive print on Hahnemuhle paper - image 44 x 125cm - edition of 3

1/17

scanned cine film frames
 
Observation works are the result of manually filming a fixed point on a system capturing just a small part of a wide view before the camera, frame by frame at regular intervals over a period of time - these photographed moments within a larger system draw attention to an aggregate experience of discrete moments, impermanent and in constant flux, that forms our experience of reality.

The neo-confuscious concept of Li (理) holds that everything is patterned according to the order of flow, an idea which also can be found at the root of contemporary system thinking; the understanding of parts in terms of their relationship to and expression of the whole - each point within a system expressing the whole system.

In most instances the works derive from a one frame exposure manually released every ten seconds for one hour, producing 360 frames.

 
Collaging the individual photographed moments in a sequential order as they were shot reveals a deeper order in the natural formation of a unified composition expressive of a unified wholeness.
 
Whereas the works are autopoietic, I am intrigued by my own intervention, which lies within the act of observation itself. The contemplative study - meditative, mindful, the aesthetic interplay of consciousness, perception and thought. Whilst physics speaks of the observer effect; the idea that observation alters an observed system - the philosophical idea of solipsism proposes that the very act of observation brings something into existence.